Air Currents July 2000

News Bulletin Board

ARIZONA SOARING ASSOCIATION

The Arizona Soaring Association is a chapter of the Soaring Society of America. It is a non-profit corporation in the State of Arizona for the purpose of fostering the sport and science of soaring and educating the public on motorless flight in Arizona. 

2000 ASA Officers and Directors
President Rick Rubscha 623-878-6750 rickscha@uswest.net
Vice President Gary Hedges 480-314-9427 Hedgesp9@aol.com
Treasurer Mike McNulty 480-473-4480 m_mcnulty@compuserve.com
Secretary Mike Stringfellow 480-595-5450 mike_s@powercet.com
Director Bob Thompson 602-938-9550 soaring@uswest.net
Director Jim Tagliani 602-437-1382 jt1@uswest.net
Director Carol Patterson 623-561-5454 carol@mail.itnsa.net
Director Jeff Reynolds 602-482-9723 jeff@kemmeriesaviation.com
Director Owen Jones 480-951-8724 ojjjr@aol.com
ASA Committees
Aircraft Manager Jeff Reynolds 602-482-9723 jeff@kemmeriesaviation.com
Contest Manager Tony Smolder 602-942-6519 clement.smolder@iac.honeywell.com
Membership Arnie Jurn 602-279-7840 ajurn@prodigy.net
Social Director Bob Blakemore 480-563-0740 gzbob@aol.com
Saftey Director Gary Hedges 480-314-9427 Hedgesp9@aol.com
Airspace Advisor Mike McNulty 480-473-4480 m_mcnulty@compuserve.com
Newsletter Editor Carol Patterson 623-561-5454 carol@mail.itnsa.net
WebSite Administrator Jim Tagliani 602-437-1382 jt1@uswest.net
Legal Advisor Peter VanCamp 623-896-9413 n/a
Historian Ruth Petry 602-274-3968 n/a
Program Directors Bob Thompson 602-938-9550 soaring@uswest.net

MEETINGS

Tuesday July 25, 7pm General Membership Meeting Barros Pizza - Coral Gables & 7th Street, Phoenix

Tuesday, August 1, 7pm Board Meeting Barros Pizza - Coral Gables & 7th Street, Phoenix

Help Save Turf! The Arizona Soaring Association and Turf Soaring School urges all Glider pilots and concerned citizens to attend the Peoria City Council Meeting scheduled for Tuesday, August 1, 2000 at 3:00pm at the Peoria City Complex.

ASA Statistical Data for July 2000 Web site: http://www.glider.com/asa Current Membership Count 101, Reciprocal Newsletters 10, Air Currents Circulation for July, 2000 AIR CURRENTS is published monthly but the Arizona Soaring Association to disseminate news, opinion, education and items of interest to members. The subscription rate for non-members is $20/yr. Complimentary copies are mailed to: editors of sister publications on an exchange basis, regular members, advertisers, and non-members who have contributed materials for publication. Articles on any subject pertaining to soaring are welcome. Electronic submissions by Email, modem or IBM compatible floppy disk are preferred. Typed or clearly hand written submissions are also acceptable. Please submit to: Air Currents, c/o Carol Patterson 8903 W. Salter; Peoria, AZ 85283 561-5454. carol@mail.itnsa.net ADVERTISING POLICY: Non-commercial advertising from ASA members will be printed without charge. Other advertising will be printed, on a space available basis, at the following rates: full page, $10; half page, $5; less than half page


ASA Race Series Calendar

2000

Date  Location  Contest Director 
April 1  Turf Mike Parker
April 2  Turf Mike McNulty
April 15  Estrella Bob von Hellens
April 16  Estrella Bill Prokes
April 29  Turf Andy Durbin
April 30  Turf Cliff Hilty
May 13  El-Tiro Bill Poore
May 14  El-Tiro John Goodman
May 20  Willcox Hans Heydrich
May 21  Willcox John Leibacher
June 10  Bisbee Casey Lenox
June 11  Bisbee Neil McLeod
August 5  Estrella Mark Hardesty
August 6  Estrella Ralph Bergh
August 19  Turf Kirk Stant
August 20  Turf Ron Mastaler
September 2  Estrella Alan Reeter
September 3  Estrella Rick Rubscha
September 4  Estrella

HELP SAVE TURF!

Expanding Turf's Pleasant Valley Airport has been determined to be the most effective means of serving the future aviation needs of North Peoria, according to a study done by Coffman Associates a consultant hired by the city of Peoria to research the possibility of building a new airport.

Expanding the existing Pleasant Valley airport was chosen over four other airport locations, all of which would have resulted in the closing of the existing Turf operation. The initial criteria for identifying the potential sites included environmental features, floodplains, future development projects, accessibility, and mountain ranges near the projected airport. Cost was also an important factor, but all five sites were similar in that respect. After evaluating the various constraints, cost and environmental impacts, the existing Pleasant Valley Airport was selected at the most feasible and perhaps most manageable.

How to make the airport profitable was also explored by the study, which gave the city three options: place the airport under the city's supervision, contract it out or privatize.

The Peoria City Council is going to hold a meeting in the Peoria Council Chambers at 3:00pm on Tuesday, 1 August to review and discuss the proposal. This is where all of us ASA members who use and enjoy Turf can help. Roy Coulliette has asked that anyone who can be at the meeting show up to demonstrate our support for the Pleasant Valley airport. A good turnout will help assure that our sport will continue to be able to enjoy Turf in the foreseeable future, instead of being forced to move out as has happened at so many other glider operations that have lost the use of their airport.

Anyone interested in the details of the Pleasant Valley Airport Study should contact Roy, who has a copy of the report out at Turf, or me. This report includes detailed diagrams of all the various proposed airport layouts, which by themselves are worth the trip to Turf. Details can also be found in the July 7, 2000 edition of the Peoria Times.

Kirk Stant stant@primenet.com


Safety Corner

I have inserted 2 accident reports from the NTSB at www.nstb.gov. Suggestions are always welcome!

Report 1

NTSB Identification: LAX00LA240

Accident occurred JUN-23-00 at TEHACHAPI, CA Aircraft: Schweizer SGS 1-26C, registration: N2792Z Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On June 23, 2000, at 1315 hours Pacific daylight time, a Schweizer SGS 1-26C, N2792Z, impacted terrain while on approach for landing at the Mountain Valley Airport, Tehachapi, California. The glider, owned and operated by the pilot under 14 CFR Part 91, sustained substantial damage. The commercial glider pilot received fatal injuries. Visual meteorological conditions existed for the personal flight and no flight plan was filed. The local area soaring flight had departed from the Mountain Valley Airport an unknown time on the day of the accident. A witness, interviewed by a deputy from the Kern County Sheriff's department, stated that he observed the glider make a right turn from downwind to base and continue in a descending 360-degree turn until it impacted terrain. According to the airport manager, the glider had been delivered to the airport on June 6th or 7th of 2000. The owner was observed to have reassembled the glider, and it had not been disassembled since that date. She indicated that the pilot soared at least once a week if not more, and that on Wednesday, June 21st the pilot had told her that he had a "good flight." In an interview with a Safety Board investigator, the airport manager who is also a certified weather observer for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) stated that weather is recorded once a day at 1600. She surveyed the weather at 1315 and reported that it was approximately 82 degrees Fahrenheit with winds from 260 degrees at 12 knots, the cloud layer was scattered at 14,000 feet. NTSB Identification: LAX00LA232

Report 2

Accident occurred JUN-17-00 at COLEVILLE, CA Aircraft: Schleicher AS20, registration: N59WM Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On June 17, 2000, at 1500 hours Pacific daylight time, a Schleicher AS20, N59WM, collided with a fence on an aero tow takeoff from an dirt field near Coleville, California. The glider, owned and operated by the pilot under 14 CFR Part 91, sustained substantial damage. The commercial glider pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions existed for the personal flight and a flight plan was not filed. The cross-country flight originated from Truckee-Tahoe, California, airport at an unknown time and had made an unplanned landing in the field. After leaving Truckee-Tahoe airport, the pilot reported that he lost lift and decided to make a precautionary landing in a field. Upon learning that there was a soaring club located nearby, he made contact with the club and requested an aero tow him out of the field. During an attempt to get the airplane out of the field the tow plane made contact with a fence. The sailplane released, and cleared the tow plane by 2 to 4 feet, traveled across a road, and collided with another fence.


For Sale

For Sale GROB ASTIR CS "3S" 1200 hours $23,000 Joel Cook 619 296 3976 jcook3s@home.com Based @ Warner Springs, CA Minden Trailer with true 1-man rigging Nelson O2 regulator/oximyser canula/Scott Sierra mask Spare O2 cylinder Mylar seals Turbulators Pneumatic tail dolly Wing wheel Back saver ramp. Instrument Panel. Sage Vario "SV" with Schumann "box" 20 knot Winter mechanical vario, ASI, Altimeter, compass, external thermometer NEW Microair 760 channel radio with new Boom Mike, new PTT NEW Ball GCI Flight Computer/secure FIA data recorder Garmin 90 GPS Gear Warning alarm Additional Equipment/Supplies; Energy absorbing cushion, relief tube system Parachute New 10 Amp Hour Dryfit Gel Cell Battery New Industrial Grade Charger Land out kit with collapsible tie down stakes WX Seal, WX Block sailplane polish ~ 1qt each, recent application Canopy Polish - LP brand (new bottle) Canopy - new Meccaplex (factory canopy) '94 Fresh Annual May 2000 Crew Radio With car mount Antenna, PTT mike, alt 7.5 AH battery Tool Box that fits in trailer with many supplies Professional touch up of trailer rash and wing dings this year Great ship, easy to fly, flys great with water, full documentation in log of history

For Sale

For Sale Standard Cirrus B "AV" Cambridge M-nav Winter Mechanical vario Radair 360 Dual batteries Oxygen Factory ballast tanks Upholstered cockpit Pushrod seals Security 150 chute Eberle Trailer Wing stands Camera and mount Vehicle water tank with electric pump Manufactured 1972 1220 hours

$14,500 or best offer Jeff Turner (480) 940-4050 eves jeffery.a.turner@worldnet.att.net

For Sale

"LAK-12, 1995, SN-6191, 200 hours. Includes trailer, UV/Tinted canopy, Jaxida covers, Borgelt B-40 vario and Cambridge mechanical vario, Schroth safety harness, vertical compass, and ELT. May be seen at Moriarty until June or at Turf Soaring after June. $20,000 or best serious offer. (480) 816-0071 or email adresler@primenet.com


Arizona Soaring Association Board Minutes: July 11, 2000

The meeting was held at Barro's Pizza, Coral Gables & 7th Street, Phoenix, Arizona.

Attending: Rick Rubscha Owen James Mike McNulty Gary Hedges Jeff Reynolds

Guests: Kirk Stant Peter VanCamp Roy Coulliette Lala VanCamp

President Rick Rubscha called the meeting to order at 7:25 p.m.

Treasurer Mike McNulty reported on the Region 9 West Contest financial results. Total revenues were $7250 and total expenses were $8373, for a net loss of $1123. Primary contributors to the loss were food expenses and lack of tee shirt sales, all coupled with a low number of participants. Inputs from contestants were positive and would indicate that attendance would improve if future contests were held. There are tee shirts remaining and Roy Coulliette was asked if he would be willing to sell them through Turf. Roy will consider it and suggested that, in the future, if the shirts had a reference to Turf, he would underwrite the cost of the shirts.

A safety discussion was held and, while it was felt that pilots are doing a good job of alerting each other of transiting airplanes and announcing position in the pattern, there was concern expressed about low finishes over people and equipment. This subject will be addressed more extensively.

A possible program for the next general membership meeting was discussed. The Prescott Soaring Club will be contacted to share information about their operations. Given the short notice, it might not be possible for the next meeting, and then it will be scheduled for a future one.

Roy Coulliette gave an update on the status of the City of Peoria's interest in expanding the Pleasant Valley Airport. He is encouraged by the consultants' recommendations and requests that ASA members attend the Peoria City Council meeting on August 1 at 3:00 p.m. at the Peoria City Hall. There will be a more comprehensive update article provided to the members.

Oxygen refill procedures were discussed. A report will be provided to the members.

There was an initial discussion of creating a membership card. That would have the ability to identify the privileges available to each member.

The annual banquet date and location has been determined. It will be held Saturday, October 14 at the Orange Tree Golf Resort in Scottsdale.

Equipment manager Jeff Turner reported a new weight and balance has been completed on the Lark. Empty Weight 980 Gross Weight 1301 Useful Load 321

The meeting was adjourned at 8:45 p.m.

Respectfully Submitted,

Gary Hedges for Secretary Mike Stringfellow


Hilty Humor

RULES OF THE AIR

1. Every takeoff is optional. Every landing is mandatory.

2. If you push the stick forward, the houses get bigger. If you pull the stick back, they get smaller. That is, unless you keep pulling the stick all the way back, then they get bigger again.

3. Flying isn't dangerous. Crashing is what's dangerous.

4. It's always better to be down here wishing you were up there, than up there wishing you were down here.

5. The ONLY time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.

6. The propeller is just a big fan used to keep the pilot cool. When it stops, you can actually watch the pilot start sweating.

7. When in doubt, hold on to your altitude. No one has ever collided with the sky.

8. A 'good' landing is one from which you can walk away. A 'great' landing is one after which they can use the aircraft again.

9. Learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make all of them yourself.

10. You know you've landed with the wheels up, or are involved with helecopters, if it takes full power to taxi to the ramp.

11. The probability of survival is inversely proportional to the angle of arrival. Large angle of arrival, small probability of survival and vice versa.

12. Never let an aircraft take you somewhere your brain didn't get to five minutes earlier.

13. Stay out of clouds. The silver lining everyone keeps talking about might be another airplane going in the opposite direction. Reliable sources also report that mountains have been known to hide out in clouds.

14. Always try to keep the number of landings you make equal to the number of take offs you've made.

15. There are three simple rules for making a smooth landing. Unfortunately no one knows what they are.

16. You start with a bag full of luck and an empty bag of experience. The trick is to fill the bag of experience before you empty the bag of luck.

17. Helicopters can't fly; they're just so ugly the earth repels them.

18. If all you can see out of the window is ground that's going round and round and all you can hear is commotion coming from the passenger compartment, things are not at all as they should be.

19. In the ongoing battle between objects made of aluminum going hundreds of miles per hour and the ground going zero miles per hour, the ground has yet to lose.

20. Good judgment comes from experience. Unfortunately, the experience usually comes from bad judgment. See #21.

21. It's always a good idea to keep the pointy end going forward as much as possible.

22. Keep looking around. There's always something you've missed.

23. Remember, gravity is not just a good idea. It's the law. And it's not subject to repeal. It's just a source of occasional intense excitement.

24. The four most useless things to a pilot are the altitude above you, runway behind you, fuel in the fuel truck, and a tenth of a second ago.

25. The pilot is the first one on the scene of most acft. crashes. He was also probably seriously disracted by screaming from his passengers, about his parents marital status, his IQ, and a long list of possible technical discussion topics.

26. Keep a sense of humor and remember that an Air Medal seems to be the only thing they don't convert to frequent flyer miles.

Submitted by: B. Maclean